Marching into Spring

Hello! yes, thats a tiny pile of snow on the left and a flowering spring crocus next to it. I can always count on the Hanuman Temple to provide these early signs of spring. They have flower beds next to a south-facing adobe wall–a perfect situation for the earliest blooms I know of here in Taos. Here in my own garden areas there are also signs of green emerging, notably bachelor buttons and the blue flax that grows so well here. It will be time before long to plant those delicious peas I like to grow. They don’t mind a degree of cold.

While at the temple I walked around to the back of the building and took this photo of the snow melting off the roof. Just to my left along the path is the dry acequia ditch. I expect the flow will be returning soon.

About a week ago I noticed this young aspen tree starting to bud out. We don’t see many aspens in Talpa. I presume this one was planted as landscaping for the house in front of my casita. It seems to be finding what it needs to thrive.

Here’s a closeup of the aspen buds opening. It reminds me of Ketchum, Idaho, where there were so many aspens, both in the wild and planted for landscaping.

Moving to Taos from Ketchum has made for some interesting comparisons, so much alike and yet so different. Skiers can really appreciate the similarities I’d guess. Up on the ski slopes things probably seems pretty much alike. But here in Taos the ski area is not accessible directly from town (free shuttles), like in Ketchum, nor is it visible from anyplace I’ve been. So Taos does not appear to be a ski town, though it might have that identity to those who frequent the slopes.

This is a recent sunset photo taken from the drive in front of my house. I don’t have the best view for sunset photos as there are trees and bushes or telephone lines just about everywhere you try to point a camera. Still some evenings the light is so compelling you just have to grab your camera and rush outside just to see what you can see.

That same evening I took this. I had fun positioning the moon just so among the branches of this apple tree near my house. There’s always an opportunity for a photo like this a couple of days before the actual full moon, as the moon rises in early evening to the east of my house.

Speaking of east of my house, I took this photo a couple of weeks ago at the same time of day, toward dusk. Now that’s a strange cloud. For me it kind of epitomizes what you’d expect to see here in Taos, but perhaps after you live here awhile you start to think our skies are uniquely mysterious.

Last summer’s dried marigolds and zinnias.

About Kate

A newcomer to New England I am blogging about it from that perspective. My plan is to look around for places, events and people that resonate with my values and interests around community and respect for the health of the planet as well as its people. I am a painter, collage artist, photographer, astrologer and gardener. I'm in my 70s but not retired. I admit I get tired if I try to do too much, but then I rest and become re-invigorated. I am never bored.
This entry was posted in Kate's Home Base and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Marching into Spring

  1. Linda says:

    You photographed a lenticular cloud! These clouds are rare, even in mountainous areas where they tend to form. I have never seen one firsthand in my entire life! Here’s a nice link to learn more http://www.odditycentral.com/pics/beautiful-lenticular-clouds.html

  2. Linda Bacon says:

    Hi Kate. Your photos always sooth my soul. I love the way you use light. The lenticular cloud is amazing. Thanks for the cloud link, Linda.
    Linda B.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>