Summer’s End–October

This is an amaranth plant growing in the large garden at the Hanuman Temple in Taos. There are many varieties (colors and shapes) of this ancient plant grown by humans for their health-giving seeds. I buy amaranth seeds in bulk and add them to a mix of chia and flax which I grind in an electric coffee grinder and sprinkle on food, especially salads. I add it to pancake batter and hot cereals as well. When the plants are young I pick the leaves to add to salads, but they are definitely edible at any stage of growth.

Speaking of the Hanuman Temple…they recently had an annual festival, the Bhandara, in honor of their guru. For this popular event they do traditional Indian cooking with wood fired ovens. In an outdoor area near the kitchen there are eight of these and I was able to see them in use for my first time. I’ve always wondered how and when they were used. It seemed at the time that most of the cooking that day was over and the attention was focused on these tortilla type breads that were being placed in a large wok-shaped pan of oil. On the upper left you can see how they puff up when cooked.

Here’s a view of the cooking operation. I had heard of the annual Bhandara celebration  before I moved to Taos from a good friend in Ketchum, Idaho, who had attended it many times with her family over the years. They have a close friend who’s been associated with Ram Das most of her adult life. Likely the gathering was an extended family reunion opportunity. Now that I live here and usually go to the temple on Sundays I appreciate what a role it plays in bringing together like-minded people. It is a very inclusive, welcoming place.

This may not be a world-class photo but it introduces the seasonal ritual of ristras. Before I lived in Taos I thought they were just for looks but soon learned that to the pepper-addicted folks of the region they are a practical way to keep dried ones handy in the kitchen. The couple on the left have become two of my favorite farm market vendors. Love their radishes and often photograph their amazing flowers.

And this is a last look of the season of Barbara and Larry of Cosmos Farm in Dixon. Barbara was still stringing marigolds when I took this but said this would be their last time coming to the market for this year. For me there was something special about the beauty they brought with their marigolds and garden bounty and I’ll look forward to seeing them again next year.

It’s difficult to transition away from the season of the farm market which brings the spread-out and diverse community of  Taos together. The end of the market season is just one less reason to drive to “town” with any social expectations. Many of the farmers drive long distances to participate in the summer market and one can only imagine the work it takes beforehand–to plant, nurture, then harvest their produce in time for the weekly early morning drive, not to mention setting up their booths. What a gift of dedication to the good of the larger community! I’m sure I can say WE ALL thank you!

I’m not sure of the date of the last farm market but I can feel it’s soon. Last night our temperatures dipped below freezing for the first time of the season. I check the weather online so knew it was coming. I harvested all my unripe tomatoes and cut all my marigold flowers to make the strings I so love. I can take down the faded ones I made last year now and enjoy the fresh orange color and the smell of the new ones.

I am adding a stewed apple recipe to this blog for folks who both like to eat healthy and find they have an over-abundance of apples (like me). It comes from an ayurvedic cookbook (Eat Taste Heal), is great for balancing Vata, and is dairy and gluten free.

Ingredients:

2 apples, peeled, cored, and sliced

4 or 5 dried apricots, soaked in hot water 20 minutes

4 dates, preferably Medjool, pitted and cut in half

2 C water

1 tbsp maple syrup

1 tbsp grated fresh ginger (I say “or less”)

1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon, and same amount of cardamom

Put all ingredients in medium (small?) saucepan. Bring to boil over high heat. Reduce to medium-low, cover and simmer for at least 5 minutes (or longer? I say). With a ladle, transfer 1/3 of the contents, including juice, to a blender and process to a puree. Stir this back into the pan and serve warm.

Keeps well in the fridge for a week or so (my comment).

Cottonwood leaves along the curb…

Fall Excursions

This was taken in the parking lot next to the Tesuque Village Market (ta-sook-ee). The Tesuque Pueblo tribal land north of Santa Fe is bisected by the highway between Taos and Santa Fe, so anyone familiar with that route passes through signs for the three (I believe) Tesuque exits. This is where I met up with my friend for a jaunt to Santa Fe to get some needed art supplies and take a stroll down Canyon Road, a popular place for art galleries. Neither of us had taken that art walk for years and felt it was time to freshen our impressions.

This is the season when the peppers ripen to reds and oranges and find themselves strung into ristras. We spotted this decorative use of fresh ristras on an archway leading to one of the galleries on Canyon. Note the use of marigolds strung together as well. The gallery was called Galerie Corazon and was set back a bit behind another place very near the street. The owner seems very set on creating a beautiful atmosphere both inside and outside the gallery. You could feel the “corazon” (heart).

The next day I drove over to Ojo Caliente (hot springs) after turning in the SEED3 paintings I’ve been working on more or less intensely for several months. My reward.

The stretch from West Rim Road over to Hwy 285 was magically strewn with Chamisa in full glory. I stopped briefly for this quick photo just so I could talk about the wonder of the drive right now. Make me think of the “yellow brick road.” I find Chamisa very uplifting, the way it blooms with such enthusiasm, a bright yellow, just when other plants are slowing down.

This is a view of Ojo Caliente from the direction of their hiking trails, west looking east. The building with the scalloped front faces is the original/historic main building which now houses the restaurant, wine bar and guest rooms. Soon all those Cottonwood trees to the east of the buildings will be a solid brush stroke of yellow.

Just had to add this dramatic photo I took on the way home down through the Rio Grande Gorge leading to Pilar. This was taken soon after I crossed the bridge and on the side away from the river. I could tell there was ample moisture there because there was a group of cattails nearby. Yes, I picked one of them, just starting to explode with its seeds, for the SEED3 show. In any case this is our friend Chamisa blooming next to a Cottonwood–nature’s authoritative description of the color yellow. At first I thought the Cottonwood was an Aspen, but definitely not, judging from the bark. That will be another, later blog–Aspens up on Taos Mountain.

These fallen Cottonwood leaves have found their final resting place just under the Chamisa plant in the previous photo.

And just to prove that I really did drive along the Rio Grande today I offer this river shot reflecting the bright blue sky of the day. The weather could not have been more perfect. When I got home I had a short visit with my landlord and he said yesterday it rained on the property pretty hard for a brief time. I would never have imagined it. He said he was in town coming toward Talpa and could see a big rain cloud over it, and sure enough it rained pretty hard for awhile, but not in town and certainly not at Ojo. So much for weather in the mountains of New Mexico.

Home again! Gotta love the Heavenly Blue Morning Glories next to those sweet blue doors I painted a year ago.

Mystery mandala plant I saw on my Ojo hike